Women's Health: Tales from the Uterus

menopause: unmuted: Menopause in the workplace

Episode Summary

This special bonus episode features an in-depth conversation on menopause in the workplace, hosted by Dr. Minkin with guests Barbara Brooks (founder of SecondActWomen) and Dr. Nikki Shaffer (Head of Colleague Wellness at Pfizer).

Episode Notes

It’s time to talk about menopause in the workplace. In this final episode of the season, Dr. Mary Jane Minkin welcomes guests Barbara Brooks (founder of SecondActWomen) and Dr. Nikki Shaffer (Head of Colleague Wellness at Pfizer) for an in-depth discussion on the topic of menopause in the workplace. The ladies bring their expertise and life experience to reflect on common challenges and opportunities that women may face in their careers. The conversation touches on: navigating age stigma and burnout, managing menopause symptoms during the workday, shifting priorities, changing careers, and more.

Disclaimer: menopause: unmuted is designed to raise awareness, encourage communication, and share information. It is not designed to provide medical advice or promote or recommend any treatment option.

Useful Links:

Listen now! All episodes of this season available:

  1. Deanna on going through a divorce, becoming a health coach, and reclaiming her sex life after menopause
  2. Sateria on living with uterine fibroids, managing anxiety during menopause, navigating the healthcare system as a Black woman, and her role as a notable patient advocate
  3. Gina on receiving a cancer diagnosis, managing menopause in the workplace, and adopting a “say yes” attitude in midlife
  4. Deborah on determined hope, despite her struggles with endometriosis, surgically induced menopause, infertility, and migraines

Episode Transcription

menopause: unmuted season 4

Bonus Episode: Menopause in the workplace

 

Dr. Mary Jane Minkin:

It's time to unmute menopause.

Hello, and welcome to a special bonus episode of menopause: unmuted. If you've already caught up with the wonderful women in season four, thanks for listening. And if this is your first time, welcome along. 

I'm your host, Mary Jane Minkin. I'm an OB GYN and clinical professor at Yale University School of Medicine. Over my decades as a doctor, I've seen a lot of change in work culture, both within the medical profession and for the thousands of women I've treated. And I thought it was about time we had a conversation about menopause in the workplace. 

Finding the right work life balance can be challenging at any stage of life. But if you're a regular listener, you'll know that menopause is often a time where women begin to reevaluate their relationship with work. 

I meet many women who are ready for a change in midlife, maybe that's a totally new career, maybe they have more time for work now that the kids have grown up, or maybe they really want to prioritize their wellbeing. And I think this is a really important conversation to be having with ourselves, our loved ones and with our colleagues. Why? Well as life expectancy increases, much more of the workforce is made up of menopausal women, about 27 million women. 20% of the US workforce are in some phase of the menopause transition.[1] And although midlife can be a time of great opportunity for career growth, menopause symptoms can also present some challenges that might creep into our work lives. 

But if we can all get better at acknowledging how our needs and value shift with each life stage, perhaps that can lead to better ways of working for everyone. So I've invited some expert voices to join me to tackle this topic. And I hope that we might give you some food for thought. I've picked some moments from the season to spark conversation and reflection. Everyone's experience is, of course unique, so I don't know what direction we'll go in. But I am sure there will be moments that resonate for you. 

Let's begin by welcoming my expert guest for our panel today. Barbara Brooks, who is speaking to us from Denver, Colorado is founder of second act women, an organization focused on empowering women in their 40s, 50s and beyond to reach their full business potential. Hello, Barbara, could you tell listeners a little bit about what made you start SecondActWomen?

Barbara Brooks

Yes, hi, thank you. The reason why I created SecondActWomen was to create a space for women over 40 and 50 plus, to grow and gather together to support one another and provide professional and personal development workshops. So that we can fight the age bias that is not only external, but internal. And when you provide peer to peer development and personal workshops, there's nothing greater than having us come together and grow together within one big community, regardless of race, regardless of who you love, your politics, doesn't matter. I created this space for women to come together and collaborate and grow together at a time that really ageism is at its highest, sadly.

Mary Jane Minkin

Thanks so much, Barbara. And I'm also delighted to welcome Dr. Nikki Shaffer, Head of Colleague Wellness at Pfizer. Hello, Dr. Nikki, thank you for joining me today.

Dr Nikki Shaffer 

Hello, thank you for having me. So in my role within Pfizer, I lead our Colleague Wellness operations, which means that I'm responsible for the programs and elements of supporting our colleagues around the world, in their health and wellbeing. So anywhere from educational resources, to supporting their mental wellbeing to making sure that we have on site clinics in many of our facilities to support any type of work-related injury, but also those episodic personal injuries and illnesses, and get them the care and support they need so that our colleagues can continue to function both in and out of work in the most healthy and safe way they can. And additionally, the reason this is so important to me is that we did an internal study, to look at surveying and interviewing colleagues and their experiences around menopause, and what they could use or need for support. And how do we de stigmatize and bring this conversation to the forefront within the workplace to allow again, all of our colleagues to be the most successful that they can possibly be.

Mary Jane Minkin

So before we get talking, let's begin by listening to Gina from episode three of the season of menopause: unmuted. After years of long commutes and working in a fast-paced job. Gina's perimenopause alongside her treatment for thyroid cancer meant that she was finding her usual pace much more challenging.

Gina

I think at that point, I was feeling very overwhelmed. I'm also somebody that's very good at compartmentalizing things. So I knew that, during the day, I had to live my life. I'm in sales, I'm in a public facing type of a job. And at all ages of people. So, like during the day, nothing happening. Everything's grand. But you just kind of have to, you know, soldier on at that point. And inside, I'm feeling terrible. And I'm overheated. And I'm traveling and I can't sleep. And I've been staying in hotels, and trying to manage everything, dragging my suitcase through busy city streets. It was it's a lot. So that's kind of how you have to live your life if you want to be competitive. It’s a competitive world, you can't you can't be female. You can't be aging in a world that values being nimble and being kind of cool, I guess.

Mary Jane Minkin

Well, Barbara, and Dr. Nikki, can we talk about Gina’s problems here. And not only was she dealing with menopause, perimenopause, she was also dealing with thyroid disease and thyroid cancer. And I certainly can understand how she felt overwhelmed from work and life stressors. Can you all comment on that?

Dr Nikki Shaffer

Absolutely. So one of the terms that I try to avoid using is balancing work and family life, because in my mind, a balance is 50/50. And it's really not going to be a 50/50. But it's what is acceptable for each individual person that can look very different. And so with that, one of the areas that I like to focus on for our colleagues is, what small changes can you make in your life to make you feel more healthy? How do you have me time without feeling guilty? Again, I think as females, we often and I'm generalizing, feel a bit guilty about a lot of different things. Gina talked about being competitive, there are so many things that we put pressures on ourself, how do we look to find ways to help ourselves be healthy. And then the other area is looking at creating little micro changes. Is it finding five or 10 minutes to take a walk? Is it going outside and just feeling the sun beat down on your head for a few minutes? And what are those things that make a difference in your life that make you be able to feel like you are in control of what is happening, and somehow brings us back to that wellbeing principle, as well as helping you with the other physical aspects that you're going through with her challenges that Gina was speaking of.

Barbara Brooks

And I have to say what I heard was the word overwhelm. And I hear this over and over within my own community. And I've felt it myself and the burnout. And what happens is, is that we're just trying to do it all, because that's what we're told to do as women. And on top of that, we're also told, inherently, don't ask for help. If you ask for help, then you're showing a certain sense of vulnerability and judgment could be placed on us. And so we just do it all we keep going and going and go and then burnout happens. And then on top of that, we're also dealing of course, with the menopausal symptoms. And so the guilt alone, of just trying to do it all if we could just simply take a step back and ask for help and and know that it's okay to ask for that help of that colleague or that and I know it's difficult, but of that colleague or that coworker or your manager, dividing tasks versus trying to do it all. I mean, the overwhelm is just so great when it comes to this time in life.

Dr Nikki Shaffer

And I think you're right, Barbara, and it's how do you have those conversations too. How are you comfortable having conversations and is it even a need to say, oh, I'm going through menopause or I’m perimenopausal. Not necessarily. So not everybody is comfortable putting their diagnosis out there. And that is okay. I think that is another piece that people need to hear is it's okay not to put your diagnosis out there. But it's okay if you want to. But it's more about to your point, Barbara asking for the help, saying we can't do everything, without it making us feel or appear weak. And that is something that we also need to figure in our own mind and reflect on before we can even have that discussion. And it's also the old saying of the fort- can't see the forest for the trees, sometimes we're more feeling that very overwhelmed, all we're seeing are the tasks at hand and not the bigger picture. So how do we rise above that fine minutia of detail, to look at the bigger picture and be able to prioritize, and look again, internally at ourselves and think of what means the most to me? So it's not just what means the most to that my employer, or my family, but what means the most to me? And how do I prioritize?

Barbara Brooks

I think it's there, I think it's to each their own. So I feel like it wasn't until this year when I figured out that I can't do it all. And I think for others, they figured that out at 45. And others, they figure- they figured that out at 51. And in my community of blacks, that's often not something that we are, are taught to do. And I am saying to other black women, it is okay to say I need help, is not a sign of weakness. It's a sign of growth.

Mary Jane Minkin 

And one of the things that we're all dealing with, I think, is the stigma of being older. And unfortunately, in this country, there's a lot of stigma, stigmata attached to being older. And of course, first of all, going through menopause really doesn't mean that you're getting older, I deal with a lot of women in their early 40s going through menopause, it happens regularly. And first of all, not that 60 is old, but certainly 40 isn't older, and they're dealing with some of these hormonal changes, which can, as we can see from all of our ladies that we've been speaking with in these episodes, can be really tough for many, many people for very, very tough women. So I think we have to say, hey, these things can be really tough to be going through, let's help each other to get through it, which I think that you both are doing tremendously. And to say you're getting through it, and you're going to be fine. And maybe one thing that we can take some lessons from, you know, saying that we don't need to hide symptoms, you know, going through menopause. Well, that's what we're doing. And, you know, maybe we could take some lessons from our gay friends and colleagues who talked about being out and proud. And you know, we're menopausal. That's cool, we're there.

Barbara Brooks

Can I tell you when I speak, if I'm hot flashing from the stage, I say it, sometimes I even have to bring out the fan. Because I want to erase that stigma that this is 57, things happen. I'm hot flashing. It's a part of my body. It's a part of who I am. But I'm actually one of those where more of us can be more comfortable admitting it, the more of us that can that can say boldly and proudly this is you know, I'm in menopause, or peri or I'm coming out of it. Wow, I feel like the more chances of this of this stigma of it being attached to age and aging will go away. So own it, and love it. 

 

Dr Nikki Shaffer 

It is about that perspective, we all need to have those support networks, whether it's in the workplace, whether it's in our personal life, but it's great to have it in both places to be able toknow that there's light at the end of the tunnel. And I had a health scare many years ago. And what we always said was that there's another side it's needing to have somebody say that a cancer journey, you, you are going to come out on the other side. What that looks like with everybody is different, but you need people along the way to say, look, I'm a living example, that there is life after this and and be able to have when you're in the middle of it see that somebody else has been able to be courageous and strong and make it through and so that community of support cannot be minimized.

Mary Jane Minkin

Ah, those are wonderful thoughts, Barbara and Dr. Nikki, thank you. Like Gina, Sateria has also been pushing herself and realized she needed to make some changes. Let's hear from Sateria and how she adjusted to her perimenopause experience

Sateria

It causes you to assess your priorities. And that does make you put a spotlight on that time of your life and assess the importance of everything. When you hear news stories of women who are walking into the workplace and quitting during menopause, I totally, totally get that. Because I've had to learn, you have to exercise differently, you have to eat differently. 20 pounds just comes on, and it just won't go anywhere, despite what you do. I, I eat so much less than I did when I was younger, I exercise more, I've really had to relearn my body. And then you add to that, to those dynamics, the fact that in my instance, you're caring for an elderly parent, you're leading an organization, there's just no room for craziness, any anything that's not a priority. It caused me to become laser focused on what I needed for my own preservation, where before I had been a huge people pleaser, and trained or, or thought that I needed to follow the expectation, which is to just work myself to death, like, I'm a different person in terms of my pace and my priorities.

Mary Jane Minkin 

You notice, she talks about a change in focus. Do you both resonate with that, personally and at work?

Dr Nikki Shaffer 

Absolutely. I have three children. And I also wanted to be a career woman. During the whole time, I was had- I had my children. And I listened to what Sateria said, and it really resonates. My children are now grown, or all but grown and out of the house. And my life for the past 22 years has been focused around them. So while I was also building my career, and really advancing my career, I would stop and do anything for my kids. And when my work schedule became such that it was impacting my ability to be able to see their events or be part of their activity, I made changes. And now I face a different side of this, that now they're grown. And yes, they still need me because I think three sons will always need their mom, or at least that's what I tell myself. It's not the same, it's not the day-to-day intricate details. And I'm also continuing to expand my career. But I also find myself reflecting on what's important in a different manner. I'm also more tired, I look back at all I did when the kids were little and working full time and getting four hours of sleep. And that's not functional any longer. And the things that I could remember all the time and never write down, I find myself writing a lot of things down. And so my reflection looks at what do I want the next 20 years to look like? What do I want the rest of my life to look like? And as many of our listeners have probably also been touched by either a family member's loss of life or a close friend. And that also brings a different reflection. I have recently lost a very good friend of mine, two months shy of her 50th birthday. And that took a huge toll on me and a reflection. And Barbara had mentioned that we celebrate our life and we celebrate aging. And I took that approach when I did turn 50 because she didn't have that opportunity to make it to that milestone. So it has had me reflecting and looking at what I want to have happen. 

Mary Jane Minkin

Barbara?

Barbara Brooks 

So, so much to this because that I can relate to as well. And I don't have kids but I've recently become a new caregiver to my mother. And so I'm I have now and I've lost friends to cancer. My mother had her stroke in March. I never in my wildest dreams did I ever think that strong Texas mother would ever now be in assisted living and looking at life differently. This is the year that I truly am, have been looking at life differently and watching it and managing my own boundaries. And I'm now going to remain a giver but I'm also giving back to me. I am- have done the same reflection. I create a seasonal live life list of things I want to do personally and professionally and I'm now sticking to those things. So that when my the day comes that people are saying things about me that I not only gave others, but I gave myself.

Mary Jane Minkin

And you know what I hear in listening to both Barbara and Dr. Nikki. And this is something we hear every time we go on an airplane, remember, we get the advice overhead, you know, you have to put your own oxygen mask on first before you help others. So I think that we're hearing a variation of we have to do that to take care of ourselves before we help take care of everybody else. And I always lecture to my medical students and residents that you just can't look at menopause as a disease state, it's not, we basically, it's have to realize it's the woman experiencing all these hormonal changes, often at a very vulnerable time of life, both socially and workwise, we need to realize all of that.

Dr Nikki Shaffer 

The stigma of no longer remembering, and keeping up with everything that we've done for many years, or needing to take some notes or changing our, our pathways, or our minds are just thinking differently, knowing those symptoms ahead of time, and not even symptoms, knowing that our bodies are changing. I think sometimes when we say symptoms, we think negatively that that's a disease state, that it's more this is our body changing. We talk about our bodies changing when we're going through pregnancy, we talk about bodies changing through puberty, but talking about body changes mentally, physically, how it impacts us from early on, can be impactful, and less scary and less stigmatizing for most women to be able to not think that it's a weakness that this is the next stage or this is what is happening and prepare for what they can do to help themselves and their friends to be successful.

Mary Jane Minkin 

Can I ask a couple of questions? Looking at things, both both sides now here, taking the perspective of a manager, how do you suggest supporting someone who you think is at risk of burning themselves out? And conversely, how should an employee approach a conversation with their manager if they feel burned out?

Dr Nikki Shaffer 

So they’re courageous conversations on both sides, and my team within Pfizer spends a good bit of effort and time talking to teams about conversation. And it can be pretty simple. There is a program out of Australia that is called Are you okay? And it really is about asking the question of how are you doing? What is happening with you, anything I can do to help you. Just really having that dialogue and not in a public forum, you don't need to ask in front of all of your- their peers, or even approaching a manager in front of a whole group, it can be very one on one or small group. Then listening. We as a society don't often take the time to listen or actually hear what someone is saying. And then offering encouraging support. Because oftentimes, folks don't know where to turn. So is that have you checked with your medical provider? Have you talked to your healthcare provider? In the workplace, have you talked to our clinicians, our Employee Assistance Program. And then it's the follow up, so circling back, so that continuum of care where you start with an initial conversation about are you- how are you doing? Are you alright? And then coming back to it a couple days later, or a week later, and having a follow up dialogue. It can be that simple as creating a comfortable environment, you can't just out of the blue, if you're normally in a very stressful very professional, non non private talking or you know, we don't talk with somebody about their family or what have you, you want to ease into these conversations. But really, it's just getting people used to having conversation again, and being able to express their feelings on both sides. So for managers, that's the communication and encouragement and tools that we give them is how to have those conversations. And then on the flip side, how do you build an employee to have the comfort and the courage to be able to talk through their feelings of being burned out, the need for help, and recognizing that you're not going to be reprimanded or get penalized by asking for help. So it's really again around those key principles of conversation.

Barbara Brooks

And I think it's tricky because I feel like a lot of the women today if they were to go to an employer, especially if they're male, that they would, they would not go to their employer or their HR or their D&I department because of ageism, because they are fearful they're going to lose their job, that if they admit they're in menopause, that means that you're of a certain age. And that puts the age the ageism spotlight on you. So somehow there has to be what Dr. Shaffer just said, is that there has to be education, more particularly of males, because males, are they’re more of them in a lot of the industries that are that are leading. And so I don't know who would feel comfortable doing that right now. Because the conversations are still not being had. And if they are had, it goes back to aging. You're old. You're this, you're that. So I think that's a tricky, tricky question, frankly.

Mary Jane Minkin

Well, I think we're fortunately hearing some more people who are listening and maybe they're learning something for our menopause: unmuted podcast. 

You're listening to a special bonus episode of menopause. unmuted with me, Mary Jane Minkin. I'm delighted to be joined by Dr. Nikki Shaffer, Head of Colleague Wellness at Pfizer and Barbara Brooks, founder of SecondActWomen for a conversation about menopause, midlife and work. 

If any of these topics resonate with you, I want to encourage you to talk about them. Perhaps you can begin with a friend or loved one you're comfortable with. And if you feel unsure about starting a conversation at work, why not share this episode with a trusted colleague. I want to remind you that you can hear every story in full along with expert advice on nutrition, fitness, intimacy, and brain health. Just follow or subscribe to this feed to get every episode. Let's get back to our current season and Deborah our guest from episode four. Deborah shared a really vulnerable moment where she had to make the difficult decision of letting go of a career she loved. Let's listen to her.

Deborah

When I went into menopause, my migraines became unbearable. I lost two careers. My first career was as a purser for an airline and migraines became unmanageable with that lifestyle. So I took redundancy, and then I retrained as as a counselor, and I loved my work. I really built up a very, very busy counseling practice. But my migraines became worse and worse and worse to the extent that I could no longer juggle my migraines with my clients. So I literally handed my practice over to two fantastic colleagues that that I knew. And then I was kind of drift- yeah, I was drifting I was anchor less, I didn't really know what or who I was anymore.

Mary Jane Minkin

While many women can relate to masking and managing symptoms in the workplace, Deborah here captures when a health concern moves from unmanageable to debilitating. You've heard from Deborah, here's somebody who's put in a very difficult decision to put her career on pause and to focus on her health and it can be a devastating reality. And have you been there as far as supporting someone in navigating this type of a difficult decision? 

Barbara Brooks

Yeah, I would say that it's very important, as as Dr. Shaffer said, is to seek help and I am hearing from more and more of us and I feel like Gen Xers are more apt to go see and seek the help that they need wherever, whether it's in mindfulness, OBGYN, primary care, a therapist. I feel as if more and more of us are comfortable doing that, unlike our mothers and fathers back in the day. There was a stigma to that alone. So it sounds like to me that's what Deborah did is she, I mean, it's it's too bad that she had to let go of her love, of her her practice.

Dr Nikki Shaffer

But I would add a different lens to that, as a health care provider, I would encourage anyone to put their health first. So while it is absolutely devastating that she had to give up her love of her career and the job that she was doing, regardless of whether you're you're faced with a cancer diagnosis, a- Crohn's disease or an immunodeficiency diagnosis. Whatever it may be, it is utmost important that you take care of your health. So this may just be a stumbling block or a change in direction for Deborah. And while we are relating what was going on with her, it's important to recognize that she did a very courageous thing by taking that step to take care of her health. And a lot of times, we don't do that. We continue to try to push through at all costs. So I really want to put that focus on the courage that it took her to do that, and the amazing ability to push ahead to get herself into a better medical state to proceed to the next phases of her life. 

Mary Jane Minkin

And you know, Deborah's feeling that she describes, anchorless. And I'm sure that many of our listeners are resonating with this. And they're feeling disconnected from their work identity. And exactly, as Dr. Nikki says, and Barbara says, that you need to take care of yourself, get the appropriate health care. And I think that'll give you a sense of getting more anchored into where you are. I'd like to quickly add that this moment of feeling anchorless that Deborah described did not last forever. It might not surprise you hear her way with words, Deborah did find a door opening, which led her to become a poet. Another woman who embraced new opportunities and pivoted careers in midlife is Deanna. Let's hear her now.

Deanna

As I started sharing my journey on Well and Worthy Life as just a blog. I started getting so many questions. And I had written a blog post on losing weight. And so then I really started getting questions. And I didn't feel like I was qualified to coach somebody. But I knew I could help people, I knew I could. So I got certified with IIN Institute of Integrative Nutrition, and became a health coach. And as I started coaching, I noticed the women that were coming to me, were over 40, and they were struggling with all same things that I had. Again, it goes back to connecting the dots, and we have to do things in our 40s 50s 60s and beyond, that we did differently in our 20s and 30s. So I'm hopeful that I can make a huge difference in other people's journey.

Mary Jane Minkin

Many women change careers in midlife. And I think that does prompt discussion how that menopause and common midlife events can spark this change. We've been talking about that, further thoughts from you, Barbara and Dr. Nikki?

Barbara Brooks

Yeah, our mindset has changed. It's a beautiful thing. I like to say when I write a book, it's going to be called Growing up at 50 because I really truly feel as though I'm owning myself, our mindset has changed, we understand we're owning who we are. Yes, there's age bias that comes in-sneaks in. But the idea that who we are in this time of life that we’re we’re dropping all of the things that were placed on us, all of the the judgment, feelings if you need to be liked by people, by everyone. It's it's just this this opening of this, I don't know how to explain it, I really truly feel that it's a mindset change. But there is this, this change this of wanting to be do learn more, do more in life. I just it's an awakening that has seemed to have happened with with many of us once we hit, you know, different ages, but certainly ages over 45, no doubt.

Mary Jane Minkin

I hope we can have that enthusiasm in many of our listeners. Dr. Nikki, your thoughts on that?

Dr Nikki Shaffer

I would echo what Barbara has said in that, it is a time to celebrate that change of direction and it is like the curtain has been opened. And I know even for myself 20s and 30s were about feeling like I needed to get myself established and prove myself. So prove myself as a mom, prove myself as a wife, prove myself as an employee and valued member of my profession. And I'm still growing, I haven't fully, the curtain hasn't fully opened. But there are those transitions, that I do find myself less in the people pleasing, realizing that I am valued for who I am, what I contribute, and so many other just inherent things about me as an individual. And it is that turning point to say, what else do I want with my life? And it's what do I want? Not, what does my family want? What does my employer want, it's what I want. And I too hope that women, just like Deanna, were able to see that importance. And the need, she saw where she had a niche to be able to grow and fulfill her desires, but also to help others. And I really saw that Deanna was able to embrace that change, and yet feel so empowered to help other people. So I too hope that our listeners are starting to feel that same way and feel the enthusiasm that we've been feeling and sharing.

Mary Jane Minkin 

It is really inspiring to hear from Deanna. And it shows just how powerful a shift in mindset can be. And I think this is just terrific. 

Well, that brings us to the end of season four of menopause: unmuted, Dr. Nikki Shaffer and Barbara Brooks, I want to thank you for spending time with us today to take part in such an enriching conversation.

Barbara Brooks 

Um, I would love to say thank you for having me. And one of the things that I want the listeners to do is live their life in full color. And for me, one of the ways that I do that, is not only creating a list of things, fun things to do in my life, but every day, it's getting up. It's dressing up. It's showing up. And never, ever, ever give up.

Dr Nikki Shaffer

And thank you also for having me, it has been a pleasure. And again, look at yourselves each day, as a way to take care of you, focus on you, and make sure that you're living the life that is best for you.

Mary Jane Minkin 

I'm also so grateful to Deanna, Sateria, Gina and Deborah for being so generous with their stories, I can thoroughly recommend listening to their full episodes from this most recent season. And finally, I want to thank you for spending your precious time with us today. I hope we've given you reasons to feel positive and vital. There's never been a better time to be in midlife. 

I'm Mary Jane Minkin and I'd like to leave you with this final thought. Don't suffer in silence. Don't worry about speaking up about your menopause. Women should be able to discuss menopause with their health care providers. A woman can speak out about menopause with her OB GYN, primary care provider, nurse practitioner or midwife. There are even designated menopause practitioners that a woman can visit if she needs more information. 

Special thanks to the Women's Health team at Pfizer and to Studio Health for producing this series. Until next season, keep talking.

 

[Disclaimer]

This podcast is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace discussions with a healthcare provider. Please speak with your healthcare provider regarding any health questions. The opinions expressed in this podcast are the opinions of the individuals recorded, and not necessarily opinions endorsed by Pfizer. The women in this podcast are participating voluntarily and have not been compensated for their appearance. The host has been compensated by Pfizer. This podcast is only intended for residents of the United States

[Pfizer sting]

The podcast is powered by Pfizer

 

References

1. Let’s Talk Menopause Home Page. (n.d.). Www.letstalkmenopause.org. https://www.letstalkmenopause.org/